Keynote Speakers

AJINOMOTO Co.

Dr. Daisuke Takahashi
AJINOMOTO Co., Japan

 

Daisuke Takahashi graduated from Nihon University and earned Ph.D degree in 2012 from Gifu pharmaceutical University. After joining AJINOMOTO Co. Inc., he worked as a process chemist in amino acids, nucleosides and heterocyclic chemistry fields. He published on more than 10 scientific papers and 30 of patents so far. He commenced to research regarding peptide chemistry in 2005 and is originator of AJIPHASE® technology which combines both strong points of solid-phase and liquid-phase chemistry for peptide and oligonucleotide. He earned the International Symposium on Process Chemistry award in 2011. He is currently working on oligonucleotide and peptide chemistry as a leader of R&D in AJINOMOTO.

Prof. Atsushi Fukuoka
Hokkaido University, Japan

 

Atsushi Fukuoka is a Professor at the Institute for Catalysis (ICAT) in Hokkaido University. He studied homogeneous catalysis and received a PhD from the University of Tokyo in 1989. Then he joined Catalysis Research Center (CRC, predecessors of ICAT) and started the research on heterogeneous catalysis. Since 2010 he had served as Director of CRC and now he is Advisor to the President of Hokkaido University. He received a Society Award from The Catalysis Society of Japan in 2015 and GSC Award from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan in 2015. He is an executive council member, Officer, of the International Association of Catalysis Societies. His current research interests are in biomass conversion by heterogeneous catalysts and the catalysis of mesoporous materials.

Prof. Hiroshi Kitagawa
Kyoto University, Japan

 

Hiroshi Kitagawa finished his Ph.D course in 1991 and received his Ph.D. from Kyoto University in 1992. He moved to Institute for Molecular Science as an assistant professor in 1991, Japan Advanced Institute of Science & Technology as an assistant professor in 1994, University of Tsukuba as an associate professor in 2000, and Kyushu University as a professor in 2003. In 2009, he returned to the original laboratory at Kyoto University.

 

During the recent years, he has received several awards including Marco Polo della Scienza Italiana (2013), The Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Science & Technology, Japan (2016), European Advanced Materials Award (2016) and Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC) (2016).

 

His current research fields include solid-state chemistry, coordination chemistry, nano-science, low-dimensional electron system, and molecule-based conductors

 

LanzaTech, USA

Dr. Christophe Mihalcea
LanzaTech, USA

 

Dr. Mihalcea studied chemistry at the University of Kassel in Germany and subsequently obtained his PhD from the Technical Physics Department. He was then offered a post-doctoral position at AIST Tsukuba Japan where he participated in the development of next generation optical data storage technology. Afterwards, he joined Seagate LLC, Pittsburgh, where he was doing research to achieve extremely high magnetic storage densities.

 

Dr. Mihalcea subsequently joined LanzaTech and has been involved with gas fermentation technology from the onset of the company. He was instrumental in setting up LanzaTech research labs and played a key role in the microbial selection process that led to LanzaTech’s proprietary organism. Today this organism is used to produce ethanol at scale and as the base for the company’s synthetic biology efforts to produce a variety of new chemicals. Dr. Mihalcea has published more than 45 peer reviewed research papers and has more than 28 published patents.

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Prof. Robin Chi
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

 

Robin Chi received his PhD in year 2007 from University of Wisconsin and BSc in Applied Chemistry (Hons) from Hong Kong Baptist University in year 2002.

 

Currently, he is a NRF investigator and a professor in the division of Chemistry & Biological Chemistry from the School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences in Nanyang Technological University. His research focuses on OrganoCatalysis, Chemical Synthesis and Functional Molecules.

National University of Singapore, Singapore

Prof. Zhi Li
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

Prof. Li Zhi received Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry from the University of Vienna in 1991. He then worked at the Swiss Federal Institute (ETH) Zurich in the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry as a postdoc and in the Institute of Biotechnology as a group leader. In 2006 he moved to National University of Singapore as an associate professor at the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. He was a fellow of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (2006–2015). Prof. Li’s research focuses on biocatalysis for chemical synthesis, especially for enantioselective synthesis and green pharmaceutical manufacturing; bio-based chemical and fuel production; and polymeric biomaterials. His expertise in biocatalysis includes enzyme discovery and evolution, cascade biotransformations, enzyme immobilization, biotransformations in vivo and in vitro, and bioprocess development. He received Singapore Award for Sustainable Technology from IChemE (2013). Prof. Li is the academic leader of Biocatalysis Work Stream of the Pharmaceutical Innovation Program Singapore (PIPS) and the lead PI of a NRF Competitive Research Programme (CRP) on “Green and Sustainable Pharmaceutical Manufacturing via Biocatalysis”. He severs as the deputy president of Singapore Catalysis Society.

Novartis Pharma, Switzerland

Dr. Fabrice Gallou
Novartis Pharma, Switzerland

 

Fabrice Gallou received his PhD from The Ohio State University in the field of natural product synthesis. He then joined the Chemical Development group at Boehringer Ingelheim, USA, and subsequently moved to Novartis, Switzerland, where he has been ever since. He is currently leading the global scientific office for the Chemical & Analytical Development organization, overseeing development and implementation of practical and economical chemical processes for large scale production of APIs, and in charge of academic interactions.

 

 

Southern University of Science and Technology, China

Prof. Xumu Zhang
Southern University of Science and Technology, China

 

Xumu Zhang received his BS from Wuhan University (1982) and MS from Chinese Science Academy (1985) with Professor Jiaxi Lu and University of California, San Diego (1987) with Professor Gerhard N. Schrauzer. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1992 from Stanford University under the guidance of Professor James P. Collman(The supervisor of Nobel Prize Sharpless and Grubbs). He pursued postdoctoral research at Stanford University from 1992 to 1994. Before joining SUSTech in 2015, he was a professor of chemistry in Pennstate University and distinguished professor in Rutgers University.

 

Xumu Zhang is the first person from mainland China, who won the prestigious ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2002 for his invention of the toolbox of chiral ligands for his development of homogeneous catalysts that make it practical to synthesize many chiral molecules, especially those having biological significance. In 2014, a chemical reaction was named after his name as Zhang Enyne Cycloisomerization. In frontier areas of science, Xumu Zhang has applied over 50 U.S. and international patents, published more than 280 papers and the papers are cited over 15000 times. His research interests include high efficient and selective hydrogenation and hydroformylation, biomass energy conversion and green synthesis of chiral drugs.

Prof. Bruno Bujoli
Université de Nantes, France

 

Bruno Bujoli occupies a CNRS Director of Research position at the CEISAM laboratory, University of Nantes (France).

 

His research group is known for its pioneering work on phosphonate-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials, at the early stage of this emerging field in the 90’s. In particular, his activity has been focused on the use of functional phosphonic acids for the surface modification of inorganic surfaces and he has an international expertise in the application of the resulting functional materials to biotechnologies (DNA and protein microarrays) and biomaterials. For this latter area, he has designed a series of original concepts related to calcium phosphate-based smart biomaterials for bone reconstruction and therapy of bone diseases, which have been patented. He has contributed to the foundation of Graftys SA in 2005, which develops, manufactures and markets biomaterials and biotechnologies in the field of bone biology.

 

More recently, he developed new patented technologies for the production of bio-sourced bitumen from biomass residues.

 

 

Jonathan Sperry2.jpg

Prof. Jonathan Sperry
University of Auckland, New Zealand

 

Jonathan Sperry obtained his BSc (Hons) in 2002 from the University of Exeter, UK. He conducted his Ph.D under the supervision of Professor Chris Moody at the same institution, before moving to New Zealand where he spent 3.5 years as a postdoctoral researcher with Distinguished Professor Margaret Brimble at the University of Auckland. He took up a lectureship at the same institution in 2009, where he is currently an Associate Professor and a Royal Society of New Zealand Rutherford Discovery Fellow. Jon’s research interests include mechanochemistry, electrochemistry, lignin valorisation and incorporating biomass-derived building blocks into synthesis processes.

Prof. C. Oliver Kappe
University of Graz, Austria

 

C. Oliver Kappe is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Graz (Austria) and Scientific Director of the Center for Continuous Flow Synthesis and Processing (CC FLOW) at the Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering GmbH (RCPE). He received his diploma (1989) and his doctoral (1992) degrees in organic chemistry from the University of Graz where he worked with Gert Kollenz on cycloaddition and rearrangement reactions of acylketenes. After periods of postdoctoral research work on reactive intermediates and matrix isolation spectroscopy with Curt Wentrup at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia (1993-1994) and on synthetic methodology/alkaloid synthesis with Albert Padwa at Emory University in Atlanta, USA (1994-1996), he moved back to the University of Graz in 1996 to start his independent academic career. He obtained his “Habilitation” in 1998 in organic chemistry and was appointed Associate Professor in 1999. From 2011 till 2016 he held the position of Professor of “Technology of Organic Synthesis” (Organische Synthesetechnologie) at the Institute of Chemistry at the University of Graz. He has spent time as visiting scientist/professor at e.g. the Scripps Research Institute (La Jolla, USA, K. Barry Sharpless, 2003), the Toyko Institute of Technology (Toyko, Japan, T. Takahashi, 2008), the Sanford-Burnham Institute for Medical Research (Orlando, USA, 2010) and the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2013-2015).

 

Professor Kappe has an extensive general experience and a 25 years track record in synthetic and physical organic chemistry, process intensification using batch microwave technology and flow chemistry/microreaction technology, communicated in ~400 scientific publications (Research ID, WoS h-Index 71). For the past decade the focus of his research has been directed towards flow chemistry/microreaction technology, encompassing a wide variety of synthetic transformations and experimental techniques. His research group is actively involved in projects dealing with API synthesis and manufacturing, employing a number of different enabling and process intensification technologies. For his innovative work in microwave chemistry he received the 2004 Prous Science Award from the European Federation for Medicinal Chemistry and the 2010 100.000 € Houska Prize in addition to a number of other awards. In 2015 he was named Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

University of Oxford, UK

Prof. Timothy J. Donohoe
University of Oxford, UK

 

In 1989, Timothy Donohoe studied at Oxford for a D. Phil with Professor Steve Davies and then in 1992 went to the US for postdoctoral work with Professor Phil Magnus FRS. In 1994 he took up his first independent job as Lecturer in Chemistry at the University of Manchester, being promoted to Reader in 2000. In 2001 he moved to the Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Oxford as Lecturer in Chemistry and Fellow of Magdalen College. In 2004 he was appointed Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and between 2006-2011 he was Head of Organic Chemistry at Oxford.

 

Tim’s research interests lie in the field of asymmetric synthesis, catalysis and the application of this methodology to natural product synthesis. Tim has published over 180 papers and his research has been recognized with the GlaxoWellcome Award for Innovative Chemistry (1996), the Pfizer Academic Award (2000), the Novartis Young Investigator Award (2001), the AstraZeneca Award for Organic Chemistry (2002), the Royal Society of Chemistry Corday-Morgan Medal (2006), the RSC Synthetic Organic Chemistry Award (2011), the SCI process chemistry award (2012) and the RSC Charles Rees Award (2014). He is also an editor for the journal Tetrahedron Letters and a member of the Tetrahedron Executive Board.

The University of Tokyo, Japan

Prof. Shu Kobayashi
The University of Tokyo, Japan

 

Shu Kobayashi studied at The University of Tokyo, receiving his Ph.D. in 1988 working under the direction of Professor T. Mukaiyama. Following an initial period as assistant professor, he was promoted to lecturer then associate professor at Science University of Tokyo (SUT). In 1998, he moved to the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, as full professor. In 2007, he was appointed to his current position as professor of organic chemistry in the Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The
University of Tokyo. Professor Kobayashi held various visiting professorships, including the Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (1993), Kyoto University (1995), Nijmegen University (1996), Philipps-University of Marburg (1997), Paris-Sud (2010), and ESPCI (2016). Professor Kobayashi has wide-ranging research interests that include the development of new synthetic methods and novel catalysts, organic reactions in water, solid-phase and flow synthesis, total synthesis of biologically interesting compounds, and organometallic chemistry.

 

He has held numerous named lectureships and is a recipient of many prestigious awards, including the Chemical Society of Japan Award for Young Chemists (1991), Springer Award in Organometallic Chemistry (1997), IBM Science Award (2001), Organic Reactions Lecturer (2002), Nagoya Silver Medal (2002), Mitsui Chemical Catalysis Science Award (2005), JSPS Prize (2005), the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the American Chemical Society (2006), Howard Memorial Lecturer (2006), C.S. Hamilton Award (2006), Merck-Cambridge Lecturer (2007), Boehringer Ingelheim Lecturer (2009), Humboldt Research Award (2013), Green Chemistry Minister of Education Award (2013), Green Chemistry Minister of Education Award (2013), Professor Emeritus, Wuhan Institute of Technology (2013), TUM-IAS Honorary Hans Fischer Senior Fellow (2013), Professor Emeritus, Wuhan University of Technology (2014), Association for the Advancement of Science(AAAS) Fellow (2015), Toray Science and Technology Prize (2016), Professor Emeritus, Hebei Engineering University (2016).

University of California, USA

Prof. Bruce Lipshutz
University of California, USA

 

Bruce Lipshutz spent four years at Yale (1973-1977) as a graduate student with Harry Wasserman. After a two-year postdoctoral stint with E. J. Corey (Nobel Prize, 1990) at Harvard as part of the team involved with the total synthesis of the antitumor agent maytansine, he began his academic career at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1979, where today he continues as Professor of Chemistry. His program in synthesis focuses on new reagents and methodologies, mainly in the area of organometallic chemistry. While these contributions tended to fall within the area of “traditional” organic synthesis, more recently his group has shifted in large measure towards the development of new technologies in green chemistry, with the specific goal being to get organic solvents out of organic reactions. To accomplish this, the Lipshutz group has introduced the concept of “designer” surfactants that enable key transition metal-catalyzed cross-couplings, and many other reactions, to be carried out in water at room temperature. Most recently, his group has turned their attention to developing new catalysts for key Pd- and Au-catalyzed reactions that enable C-C bond formation at the parts per million level of the metal, each catalyst being utilized in water under very mild conditions. The potential for his group’s work in this field to significantly influence, and possibly transform the way in which organic chemistry is performed in the future, led to a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 2011, and more recently, the ACS GCI Peter J. Dunn Award.

University of York, UK

Prof. James Clark
University of York, United Kingdom

 

James Clark is Professor of Chemistry at the University of York, and is Founding Director of the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence and the Bio-renewables Development Centre. He also started the company Starbons Ltd and the not-for-profit company the Green Chemistry Network. He was founding scientific editor of the world-leading journal Green Chemistry and is the senior editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry Green Chemistry book series. His research has led to numerous awards including Honorary Doctorates from universities in Belgium, Germany and Sweden. He is also Visiting Professor at the University of Cape Town in South Africa and, Fudan and Sichuan universities in China where he teaches every year. He has recently been awarded a Senior Fellowship from Fudan University. He has published almost 500 original articles and written or edited over 20 books. He has given plenary lectures worldwide and advises companies and governments across the globe on topics relating to green and sustainable chemistry. He has received numerous awards and distinctions including the 2018 Royal Society of Chemistry award for Green Chemistry.

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